The best of TOR


internet_115634I think TOR‘s hidden services are dismissed too easily. They are a quick access to “anyone can host their own site” “anyone can have their own domain” and “hey, let’s have fun!”. I think more people should use TOR to host their own sites for free – decentralized is the future of the internet, though TOR can be slow (better connectivity is changing a lot of things).

While undoubtedly there are some really creepy hidden services on the TOR deep web, there are certain sites that are fascinating too. I also like using TOR features, rather than only using it as an exit node – mainly because I rarely do anything that needs obfuscation, and my regular use urls haven’t gotten blocked…. yet.

So, if you have become sick of the clichéd bookmarks with the same few sites and forums and directories, here is yet another list – but this is my bookmarks. I am not intending to be comprehensive at all. I am simply sharing .onion bookmarks from my browser. Sites I enjoyed visiting (sorry, no arms dealers and drug sources – you should go start at the Hidden Wiki or something) – in no particular sequence.

How to Exit the Matrix – a comprehensive document about the police state and the individuals right to privacy that includes systematic information on how to become untraceable on the internet.

Beneath VT – Tunnels under Virginia Tech – this site describes (illegal – trespassing) explorations of steam tunnels under Virginia Tech. It is fairly fascinating. If you liked famous five as a kid, you’ll like this one now.

ReddiTor – if you love redit for its irreverent discussions, you’ll love redditor – Reddit on the deep web. What do people say, when they don’t have to worry about their identities and how they look saying what they really feel? For example, see Reddit onions on the web and ReddiTor onions on TOR.

Tormail – your email address may look like, but you can access it only as a hidden site. Safer, anonymous and supports email clients. Send and receive emails with complete privacy.

Wikileaks mirror as a hidden site. This one was working when most else was under attack. It still works. The same with The Pirate Bay.

Stranger than fiction: Examines the WTC terrorist attack on 9/11 and meanders through history examining the Jewish control and use of the US for its own ends. Uses extensive references. Still haven’t gotten around to verifying it all, but a fascinating read nonetheless. This is one of the many fascinating documents archived in The TOR Library.

There are many libraries. I think people just share books they have as a service. (no clue on copyright scenario). Here is a library of books on Anarchy.

FreeFor is a place for pseudonomous meetings with secure and varied communications and like minded people (hopefully). This includes the brilliant idea of making public keys for encrypted/signed emails available on an .onion site itself.

And so on… I am currently running a test server on my laptop with a liquid feedback installation for Pirate Party India. It is a still developing software that aims to facilitate the process of decision making in a democratic manner by organizing the views of a large number of people – which is very difficult to do and people get overlooked under normal circumstances. We are hoping that if this works, it will aid the process of making sure citizen voices get heard.

If you enjoyed this list and found it useful… I guess I can search my bookmarks better 🙂


Note: You will not be able to see these links without downloading and installing TOR. An alternative is to add “.to” to the url, and see it on the website – which serves as a proxy for seeing .onion sites. So blahblahblahblah.onion would become – and you will be able to see it from a normal browser.

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About the Author

Vidyut is a blogger on issues of National interest. Staunch advocate of rights, learning and freedoms. @Vidyut

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