Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers

As the nuclear debate sparks, more and more voices call for dams and hydrothermal plants. And pro-nuclear activists helpfully point out that they have done more damage to life and environment than nuclear power. This is a debate that will go on for long, but in the meanwhile, I found this excellent documentary that explains why large dams are not the answer

International Rivers and Friends of the Earth International have together produced this video. This “virtual tour”, launched on the first day of the COP 17 climate meeting in Durban, has  been narrated by Nnimmo Bassey.

Nnimmo Bassey is an Environmental activist from Nigeria and winner of the Right Livelihood Award. Nnimmo Bassey’s work as Executive Director of Environmental Rights Action in Nigeria and Chair of Friends of the Earth International has turned him into one of Africa’s leading advocates and campaigners for the environment and human rights.

These points are also vocally raised by Narmada Bachao Andolan and other environmental activists. One more that comes to mind that no one seems to be noticing is the capacity of dams to store heat in the large body of water. Area takes far longer to cool in winters. Disastrous for apple crops in many Himalayan regions, because it gets less cold, and cold is crucial for a good apple crop – as a foreigner once told me about the place I lived in.

I think we need more research and evidence based decision making on the front of energy in our country. Whether we are talking about Nuclear energy or hydro-thermal energy. Or for that matter any decisions which impact many lives. We need to learn to be more scientific rather than the current method of being infatuated by a solution and then finding a way to “make it happen”.

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About the Author

Vidyut
Vidyut is a blogger on issues of National interest. Staunch advocate of rights, learning and freedoms. @Vidyut

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