Kashmiri Pandits – everybody’s concern, nobody’s responsibility

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Vidyut
Vidyut is a blogger on issues of National interest. Staunch advocate of rights, learning and freedoms. @Vidyut

13 Comments on "Kashmiri Pandits – everybody’s concern, nobody’s responsibility"

  1. I don’t think these issues can be helped through organizations. What we need to do is pressurize our government to first create that safe space for Kashmir – enforce human rights. Prosecute violators equally, create a space where Kashmiris aren’t on a constant defensive and short fuse, so that other aspects can actually be examined and talked about.

    Also important that there is stress on concrete measures rather than political loudmouthing.

  2. @Vidyut Very well written. I must say that you’ve got a clear head. As far as the opinion of your friend is concerned, I think it does not hold much weight. For one, there was never a pandit voice that rose against India, perhaps the reason that led the majority community to believe that the valley was a better place without them. The feeble Pandit voice was and continues to remain a thorn in their neck, crying out that azaadi is a utopian fantasy and not the answer to their identity crisis.

  3. @Vidyut Very well written. I must say that you’ve got a clear head. As far as the opinion of your friend is concerned, I think it does not hold much weight. For one, there was never a pandit voice that rose against India, perhaps the reason that led the majority community to believe that the valley was a better place without them. The feeble Pandit voice was and continues to remain a thorn in their neck, crying out that azaadi is a utopian fantasy and not the answer to their identity crisis.

  4. It is unfortunate that the kashmiri pandits have been a project of ethnic cleansing. the psychological trauma of being driven out of one’s homeland is immense. It may be true that people are not addressing their problems- I dont know much about this, so i wont comment.

    However, my problem with your article is not the subject of the plight of Kashmiri pandits. My problem is your careless use of analogy- comparing the problems of  kashmiri pandits with the dalits!!

    you write- “Kashmiri Pandits thus have much in common with the dalits for example.
    Why this example? Because the dalits in far, far vast numbers are still
    unheard. Also, this example, because we are used to at least knowing
    that the dalits have problems, unlike someone with a label like
    “Pandit”. Opposite ends of the caste hierarchy – very similar
    fundamental problem – no one is interested in giving them a piece of
    the cake.” !!!!!!!!

    Let me raise a few questions:

    1.High chances that every 2nd homeless person or beggar you see sleeping on the road is a dalit. How many of these homeless beggars are likely to be a kashmiri pandit or any other ‘pandit’?  How many Kashmiri pandits that you know  are ‘homeless’ in the way most of the dalits are?

    2. A consequence of ethnic cleansing is a deterioration of ones standard of living. Can you tell me how many ‘homeless’ kashmiri pandit living away from kashmir makes his/her living on construction sites? or carries human excreta? or clears animal carcasses off railway tracks? or are unable to send their children to school?

    3. A large number of Kashmiri Pandits have gone abroad seeking homes and employment. How many dalits can even imagine doing something like that to escape untouchability? how many of them have even been educated enough to even have such dreams?

    I reiterate here that I am not be-littling the plight of kashmiri pandit. But my problems are with your very simplistic comparison of their plight to that of the dalits.

    • @AR No analogy can be perfect. An analogy always highlights similarities and ignores differences. A case in point: “Your life is a bed of roses” does not imply that you sleep on rose petals everyday.

      • Thank you for letting me know that it is ‘OK to not like your writing’. I think I have expressed more than a vague ‘dislike’ of your analogy- I have explained my problem. I would appreciate it if you thought about the points I’ve raised and responded to them.

  5. It is unfortunate that the kashmiri pandits have been a project of ethnic cleansing. the psychological trauma of being driven out of one’s homeland is immense. It may be true that people are not addressing their problems- I dont know much about this, so i wont comment.

    However, my problem with your article is not the subject of the plight of Kashmiri pandits. My problem is your careless use of analogy- comparing the problems of  kashmiri pandits with the dalits!!

    you write- “Kashmiri Pandits thus have much in common with the dalits for example.
    Why this example? Because the dalits in far, far vast numbers are still
    unheard. Also, this example, because we are used to at least knowing
    that the dalits have problems, unlike someone with a label like
    “Pandit”. Opposite ends of the caste hierarchy – very similar
    fundamental problem – no one is interested in giving them a piece of
    the cake.” !!!!!!!!

    Let me raise a few questions:

    1.High chances that every 2nd homeless person or beggar you see sleeping on the road is a dalit. How many of these homeless beggars are likely to be a kashmiri pandit or any other ‘pandit’?  How many Kashmiri pandits that you know  are ‘homeless’ in the way most of the dalits are?

    2. A consequence of ethnic cleansing is a deterioration of ones standard of living. Can you tell me how many ‘homeless’ kashmiri pandit living away from kashmir makes his/her living on construction sites? or carries human excreta? or clears animal carcasses off railway tracks? or are unable to send their children to school?

    3. A large number of Kashmiri Pandits have gone abroad seeking homes and employment. How many dalits can even imagine doing something like that to escape untouchability? how many of them have even been educated enough to even have such dreams?

    I reiterate here that I am not be-littling the plight of kashmiri pandit. But my problems are with your very simplistic comparison of their plight to that of the dalits.

    • My point is not about perfection- Analogies need not be perfect. But they need to be sensible. I dont need classes from u on what analogies are. deal with the example that the author has discussed and tell me why the  the plight of dalits is comparable to the plight of the kashmiri pandit. I have detailed my problem, so respond to that

      • Erm… the why is written in a few sentences immediately after, if you scroll up. Not that you don’t have the freedom to disagree with how I see it. Every once in a while what I write is not liked by someone. And it’s fine. Really.

        I saw a similarity. You didn’t. It is ok.

        • Thank you for letting me know that it is ‘OK to not like your writing’. I think I have expressed more than a vague ‘dislike’ of your analogy- I have explained my problem. I would appreciate it if you thought about the points I’ve raised and responded to them.

  6. Obliged to those who prompted these thoughts that touched a chord……profound insight compensates for the long wait for empathy……THANKS!

  7. Wow, any idea about ANY organisations through which we could help? We were in
    Srinagar over year-end and it was heart-rending.

  8. Very Well written….glad some did write…….Mainstream media could care less… by the way this is going up on my “Blogs i liked this week” post….

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