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A Hindu writes to Hindu Organizations against Slutwalk

The below letter was originally addressed to the Vishwa Hindu Parishad for its threats against the Delhi Slutwalk. Now it is addressed to all Hindu entities opposing Slutwalk.

Dear Whom-so-ever-it-may-concern,

I was born a Hindu. Some say I still am, since there is pretty much nothing that disqualifies one as a Hindu, particularly after having been one. Hinduism is one of the few religions that doesn’t make belief a bar, and an atheist can be a Hindu, if he chooses to identify himself as such.

Hinduism (dang these “ism”s) is one of the few religions of the world, which is also referred to as a civilization, in many senses of the word. Often interchangeably when it comes to history. It is a way of thought that has endured thousands of years, absorbed, evolved and grown with each new challenge. It is one of the few religions that has re-invented and reformed itself to suit the times. I may not believe in God, but I do believe that a culture with such deep roots has a powerful and all pervading influence on all it touches.

I am concerned that this current updating of our religion is taking us into narrower space. What centuries of invaders and religious invasions couldn’t achieve, we are doing through killing the spirit in the pretense of preserving numbers. It is no use preserving numbers if the soul is dead. Our soul lies in our ability to absorb, to walk the path of truth, knowledge and responsibility.

There are many ways in which this is manifesting, but its greatest symptom is anger and intolerance. Anger always covers a fear. Always. Intolerance always covers insecurity. Always. It is when we are not certain of our survival that we start building walls. It is a protection.

My current concern is about the threat you to the slutwalk. It seems that it would be a shameful thing if women walked the streets in challenge of the character judgments against them that often lead to harassment and crime. In this too, they must bow to threats of crime against them. This is shameful. And because you claim to represent our ancient religion, you bring shame to thousands of years of tolerance and evolution.

I would like you to consider what this modern sense of morality is and its repressive effect on our religion, culture and safety.

  • I am sure like me, you grew up hearing takes of Krishna’s charming exploits including stealing clothes of bathing women. I don’t recollect there being any shame associated. It was, and is charming. It is playfulness, it is innocent flirting and it is charming as hell. Now imagine what would happen if he were to do so today. He’d still be god, the women would be called cheap for bathing in a way that left them without clothes.
  • We heard stories of swayamvars, exquisitely beautiful princesses that were coveted far and wide, we heard of people falling in love. I don’t remember when the stories called the woman cheap for attracting a man. No matter what she wore.
  • Have you ever thought about the fact that most Indian languages have no real word for adultery? Even with our moral outrage established for years, the closest we have come to it is describing them as inappropriate relations. There is a reason for that. These morals you are defending have been imported. From the UK to be precise. Amount of clothing on body has never been an issue with Hinduism.
  • The ancient Hindu culture took sexuality as a matter of fact. We have several sexual traditions, which suddenly all got rounded into prostitution, because the church had no respectable equivalent for them. So whether it is a devdasi, or a follower of the Yellama cult or a vaishya (prostitute), they are all prostitutes, because Brits didn’t have translators, and we learn ourselves through “authorities on us”.
  • We have a lot of ancient tales. Including tales of shame, violence against women and many other sins. I am yet to hear one where the shame was about clothes. The only clothes related shame was the attempted undressing of Draupadi and the shame was not hers, but that of her attackers. I don’t recall anyone accusing Draupadi of being responsible for the attack on her honor.
  • Sita lived at Ravan’s place. Her integrity has always been held as sacred. I don’t know anyone who thinks she had an affair with Ravan, or otherwise did anything bad at all. Her being criticized is on record as social bigotry, not something wrong with her.
  • There has been assorted nudity related with various choices people have made in various cults, religions like Jainism…. And I’m talking nudity. The ideal Brahmin woman would be bathing from top to toe in a river and entering the kitchen in a pure state. Yeah, saris are transparent when wet – particularly the cotton and silk ones purity demands. And you can still go to ghats near temples to see this.
  • This penchant for covering skin is an Islamic influence. It is Islam where exposing skin is prohibited by religion. Check out any religious art to verify. Goddesses have fantastic figures and bare waists.
  • Your average fisher woman, tribal, farmer  exposes about the same amount of skin as a girl in a short skirt. Your sari exposes more skin (waist) than trousers and jeans. I used to count the tires on the waists of all the aunties…. So this is about intolerance and selective offense, not even exposing of skin. Let us be clear.
  • This sexual seggregation and judgemental environment has men so deprived that their only resort to getting some joy on perfectly natural desires is by doing something illegitimate and violent. It is violent to turn a woman into an object for entertainment. It is violent to overrule her wishes. Yet this doesn’t draw as much outcry, because blaming women keeps the option of using them for cheap thrills open.
  • Menaka seduced Vishwamitra, but is never cheap. She is magnificent temptation and Vishwamitra lost his focus. He is responsible for his actions. So must Indian men be, no matter what provocation they see around them. If they don’t, the shame must be theirs, not an apsara’s, who only is her enchanting self. You have the power to encourage these values of ours, or stick to imported monotheist, women hating rules that have infected our society.

Today, Hinduism falls to an all time low, when ideas imported from the west are adopted as the gold standard and lead to threats on bona fide citizens about western influence. Where is this Hinduism you so claim to protect?

Sure, you are able to sway events to your wish. Nuisance value isn’t legitimacy, and it only insults those origins you claim to represent. I resent that, because then I end up not being a Hindu – not lost to Christian conversions, but to disgust. And it is a loss, because it is an environment I grew up in, yes, a Hindu Brahmin brought up with pride in the ability to question, reason and choose.

I recently wrote a series called “A Life in Clothes” which outlines the story of my life as a woman. You may want to read it to get a look at what all these ideas of proper and improper and dehumanizing women into objects actually do to a woman. It wasn’t easy for me to write, and I damn well hope it won’t be easy for you to read.

I think you are flat out wrong, and that you are destroying our religion with your fears. In choosing to defend Hinduism to standards of monotheist religions, you lose the race before the starting line. You are overpowering the women who are supposed to have a strong place in our culture. You are able to do it. That doesn’t make you right, just as terrorists attacking a place are able to do it, but that doesn’t make them right.

I hope you spend some time thinking about this, and realize that the path of truth, knowledge and responsibility requires that the rights of women be openly owned and marched in front of the world as a statement that their dignity is inviolate. Kali would have done it. So would Durga. Krishna would have walked along in wisdom and guidance. I dare say some of our hot-tempered goddesses would have disapproved of you objecting to them stating their splendour in whatever avatar they chose.

At the end of the day, it will not matter. There will still be perverts, repressed people, and moral police. Those who wish to claim their space must do so to. We all have one life to play out our choices in. Both you and I. Fears will be, what must guide me is purpose.

What will I do if you go ahead with your threats? Why nothing! But I will mourn for a lost religion like I mourn the melting glaciers. You can’t put ice blocks and extend the glaciers, and you can’t rescue a tolerant civilization with imported intolerance. Defending religion, policing morality or counting numbers of followers was never a Hindu idea and doing it in retaliation is only destroying our identity faster than conversions.

My invitation to you is to understand the beauty of an enduring civilization, and reclaim that space for tolerance, evolution and empowerment rather than alienate, threaten and disrupt out of intolerance. Recognize that the women marching to claim their dignity are also part of you that you threaten to amputate. Join the walk. Live the spirit of continuous empowerment rather than threatening repression.

Your sister in a timeless civilization,

Vidyut

Comments 174

  • Useless article. Am sure it will be used a million times by Christian and Islamic
    Proselytisers. Fortunately hinduism has predicted exactly these kind of Hindus long back. Tamasoma is a very good hymn for them.

  • Useless article. Am sure it will be used a million times by Christian and Islamic
    Proselytisers. Fortunately hinduism has predicted exactly these kind of Hindus long back. Tamasoma is a very good hymn for them.

  • Well expressed thoughts, I must say. Personally I am opposed to slut- walk though, because I feel it degrades women more. And I have not see any evidence of it helping uplift women. We should avoid borrrowing ideas from “West” just because we still believe we are slaves. Some original thiking, please !

  • Well expressed thoughts, I must say. Personally I am opposed to slut- walk though, because I feel it degrades women more. And I have not see any evidence of it helping uplift women. We should avoid borrrowing ideas from “West” just because we still believe we are slaves. Some original thiking, please !

  • Great Article, I have posted your article in SlutWalkBangalore.com, please ping it back. Thanks

  • Great Article, I have posted your article in SlutWalkBangalore.com, please ping it back. Thanks

  • Appreciate your perspective and very neatly articulated.
    I do not support what VHP or for that matter any politically inclined institution does in the name of Hinduism but I do not support the hyped slut walk either. If opposing it in the name of Hinduism does blatant injustice to Hinduism in itself, I do not understand what good it does to the religion just by supporting it?? After all, slutwalks are again an imported westernized idea, aren’t they?

    I condemn the prejudices our society has against women and its attributing any form of violence to their clothing. I agree with you that we are to be judged not by something we wear but I fail to understand if these slutwalks really can achieve the motive they are intended for. Are there any living proofs of these walks being able to bring about a change in the mindset of a society or for that matter in at least ONE man who cares nothing more than to ogle at the participants?? I personally think shedding clothes and exhibiting placards in unison does nothing in favor of the oppressed women except proving how we Indians crave and idolize the west!!

    • It is a different matter whether you think they are useless of useful. Important point is if people want to do it, they should be able to without threat.

      As for what difference it makes… here is how I see slutwalks creating change http://aamjanata.com/psychological-aspects-of-slutwalk-how-does-it-work/

  • Appreciate your perspective and very neatly articulated.
    I do not support what VHP or for that matter any politically inclined institution does in the name of Hinduism but I do not support the hyped slut walk either. If opposing it in the name of Hinduism does blatant injustice to Hinduism in itself, I do not understand what good it does to the religion just by supporting it?? After all, slutwalks are again an imported westernized idea, aren’t they?

    I condemn the prejudices our society has against women and its attributing any form of violence to their clothing. I agree with you that we are to be judged not by something we wear but I fail to understand if these slutwalks really can achieve the motive they are intended for. Are there any living proofs of these walks being able to bring about a change in the mindset of a society or for that matter in at least ONE man who cares nothing more than to ogle at the participants?? I personally think shedding clothes and exhibiting placards in unison does nothing in favor of the oppressed women except proving how we Indians crave and idolize the west!!

    • It is a different matter whether you think they are useless of useful. Important point is if people want to do it, they should be able to without threat.

      As for what difference it makes… here is how I see slutwalks creating change http://aamjanata.com/psychological-aspects-of-slutwalk-how-does-it-work/

  • Your post is very lucid and expressive…i do support your view about this slutwalk…but let me say you the other side of the story…what i think HINDUISM…its not LOW today…it has denigrated…it has worsened day by day…Hindu beliefs and faith destroyed with the emergence of CASTE system…as in the post vedic period the Manusmriti or Manushastra written…slokas in it considers women as COWS who are only meant for producing babies so that there milk can come to use…a cow who couldnt produce calves where to be ostracized from the society to the wild jungles…so that predators can punish them…IS THIS ECOLOGICAL BALANCE….OR DISCRIMINATION…one of the slokas also condemn women for adultery…she should be ostracized from the given society, but for men NO PUNISHMENT…and what about widows…what would you say about SATI or JOHAR system….nothing changed in the HINDU psyche.. the GHUNGHAT pratha came when the feudalism was at apex…regality ruined the poor women’s lives…whereas the PRINCESSES followed swayambar…the other varnas or castes were banned from practicsing this…about POLYANDRY…unfortunately it only prevailed between brahmins and kshatriyas…not vaisyas or shudras…same is with the other religious faiths…muslim women arent allowed to go for jumma on Fridays…Christian women before the emergence of elizabethan period werent allowed to participate in any religious functions…they were banned from entering the church til 14th century…about jainism….til the last tirthankara was born and was enlightened…women werent part of their religious orthodoxy…they were considered only as EPITOME of BEAUTY…the only free religions are the Tribals…but unfortunately throughout the world they are termed as SAVAGE and WILD…the white monolith had worked in the land of racists…and in our country its the CASTES…still today how many brahmins marry a shudra…let me reveal u the percentage of 2009-2010 report of Ministry of Women and Child Welfare…its just 0.003%…the country where till the vedic period “Freedom was seen as Expression of self-realisation, aesthetic beauty and Social recognition…” it comprised every human being..despite their gender and sexuality…its not that i am a Tribal or a Vedic Hindu…that i support that age….sometimes i wonder why in the Ancient Civilisation…the women were considered Equal…whether indus valley…or mesopotamia…
    I dont know what to say i do support the SLUTWALK…as much i support the GAY PRIDE…as much as the TRIBAL or DALIT movement…
    for me the sloka from Rigveda is the only truth : HUMAN BEINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL TILL THEY REMAIN HUMANE….THEY BECOME BLISSFUL WHEN THEY ARE HUMANITARIANS…THEY COME CLOSE TO DIVINITY WHEN THEY DONT LOSE THEIR HUMANITY AT ANY ODDS OF LIFE….

  • Your post is very lucid and expressive…i do support your view about this slutwalk…but let me say you the other side of the story…what i think HINDUISM…its not LOW today…it has denigrated…it has worsened day by day…Hindu beliefs and faith destroyed with the emergence of CASTE system…as in the post vedic period the Manusmriti or Manushastra written…slokas in it considers women as COWS who are only meant for producing babies so that there milk can come to use…a cow who couldnt produce calves where to be ostracized from the society to the wild jungles…so that predators can punish them…IS THIS ECOLOGICAL BALANCE….OR DISCRIMINATION…one of the slokas also condemn women for adultery…she should be ostracized from the given society, but for men NO PUNISHMENT…and what about widows…what would you say about SATI or JOHAR system….nothing changed in the HINDU psyche.. the GHUNGHAT pratha came when the feudalism was at apex…regality ruined the poor women’s lives…whereas the PRINCESSES followed swayambar…the other varnas or castes were banned from practicsing this…about POLYANDRY…unfortunately it only prevailed between brahmins and kshatriyas…not vaisyas or shudras…same is with the other religious faiths…muslim women arent allowed to go for jumma on Fridays…Christian women before the emergence of elizabethan period werent allowed to participate in any religious functions…they were banned from entering the church til 14th century…about jainism….til the last tirthankara was born and was enlightened…women werent part of their religious orthodoxy…they were considered only as EPITOME of BEAUTY…the only free religions are the Tribals…but unfortunately throughout the world they are termed as SAVAGE and WILD…the white monolith had worked in the land of racists…and in our country its the CASTES…still today how many brahmins marry a shudra…let me reveal u the percentage of 2009-2010 report of Ministry of Women and Child Welfare…its just 0.003%…the country where till the vedic period “Freedom was seen as Expression of self-realisation, aesthetic beauty and Social recognition…” it comprised every human being..despite their gender and sexuality…its not that i am a Tribal or a Vedic Hindu…that i support that age….sometimes i wonder why in the Ancient Civilisation…the women were considered Equal…whether indus valley…or mesopotamia…
    I dont know what to say i do support the SLUTWALK…as much i support the GAY PRIDE…as much as the TRIBAL or DALIT movement…
    for me the sloka from Rigveda is the only truth : HUMAN BEINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL TILL THEY REMAIN HUMANE….THEY BECOME BLISSFUL WHEN THEY ARE HUMANITARIANS…THEY COME CLOSE TO DIVINITY WHEN THEY DONT LOSE THEIR HUMANITY AT ANY ODDS OF LIFE….

  • Vidyut:

    1.krishna stealing clothes : that part is of his childhood..not of adulthood.And dont compare God with humans.

    2.Swayamvars: where is nudity in that?

    3.Devdasi, vaishya were may be respectful at that time…how can u
    compare them with today? and there were Saintly women too…why not
    follow them?

    4.Epic stories like Mahabharata are in fact lessons for humans to not
    perform actions as that of the characters …so that such things wont
    happen in their own lives.Why giving examples of those stories?

    5.Women bathing nude in ancient times in public?..who told u that?..did u see them with ur own eyes?

    6.why u comparing always with women like devdasis,tribals etc? u want to
    become like them…why dont u completely accept their lifestyle too!

    7.Menaka is a celestial female…are they above humans?  why u
    considering that? Human female saints are greater than these celestial
    beings. u want to become like them and dance in front of demigods/devas?

  • Vidyut:

    1.krishna stealing clothes : that part is of his childhood..not of adulthood.And dont compare God with humans.

    2.Swayamvars: where is nudity in that?

    3.Devdasi, vaishya were may be respectful at that time…how can u
    compare them with today? and there were Saintly women too…why not
    follow them?

    4.Epic stories like Mahabharata are in fact lessons for humans to not
    perform actions as that of the characters …so that such things wont
    happen in their own lives.Why giving examples of those stories?

    5.Women bathing nude in ancient times in public?..who told u that?..did u see them with ur own eyes?

    6.why u comparing always with women like devdasis,tribals etc? u want to
    become like them…why dont u completely accept their lifestyle too!

    7.Menaka is a celestial female…are they above humans?  why u
    considering that? Human female saints are greater than these celestial
    beings. u want to become like them and dance in front of demigods/devas?

  • Vidyut:

    1.krishna stealing clothes : that part is of his childhood..not of adulthood.And dont compare God with humans.

    2.Swayamvars: where is nudity in that?

    3.Devdasi, vaishya were may be respectful at that time…how can u
    compare them with today? and there were Saintly women too…why not
    follow them?

    4.Epic stories like Mahabharata are in fact lessons for humans to not
    perform actions as that of the characters …so that such things wont
    happen in their own lives.Why giving examples of those stories?

    5.Women bathing nude in ancient times in public?..who told u that?..did u see them with ur own eyes?

    6.why u comparing always with women like devdasis,tribals etc? u want to
    become like them…why dont u completely accept their lifestyle too!

    7.Menaka is a celestial female…are they above humans?  why u
    considering that? Human female saints are greater than these celestial
    beings. u want to become like them and dance in front of demigods/devas?

  • Vidyut:

    1.krishna stealing clothes : that part is of his childhood..not of adulthood.And dont compare God with humans.

    2.Swayamvars: where is nudity in that?

    3.Devdasi, vaishya were may be respectful at that time…how can u
    compare them with today? and there were Saintly women too…why not
    follow them?

    4.Epic stories like Mahabharata are in fact lessons for humans to not
    perform actions as that of the characters …so that such things wont
    happen in their own lives.Why giving examples of those stories?

    5.Women bathing nude in ancient times in public?..who told u that?..did u see them with ur own eyes?

    6.why u comparing always with women like devdasis,tribals etc? u want to
    become like them…why dont u completely accept their lifestyle too!

    7.Menaka is a celestial female…are they above humans?  why u
    considering that? Human female saints are greater than these celestial
    beings. u want to become like them and dance in front of demigods/devas?

  • Vidyut:

    1.krishna stealing clothes : that part is of his childhood..not of adulthood.And dont compare God with humans.
    2.Swayamvars: where is nudity in that?
    3.Devdasi, vaishya were may be respectful at that time…how can u compare them with today? and there were Saintly women too…why not follow them?
    4.Epic stories like Mahabharata are in fact lessons for humans to not perform actions as that of the characters …so that such things wont happen in their own lives.Why giving examples of those stories?
    5.Women bathing nude in ancient times in public?..who told u that?..did u see them with ur own eyes?
    6.why u comparing always with women like devdasis,tribals etc? u want to become like them…why dont u completely accept their lifestyle too!
    7.Menaka is a celestial female…are they above humans?  why u considering that? Human female saints are greater than these celestial beings. u want to become like them and dance in front of demigods/devas?

  • Vidyut:

    1.krishna stealing clothes : that part is of his childhood..not of adulthood.And dont compare God with humans.
    2.Swayamvars: where is nudity in that?
    3.Devdasi, vaishya were may be respectful at that time…how can u compare them with today? and there were Saintly women too…why not follow them?
    4.Epic stories like Mahabharata are in fact lessons for humans to not perform actions as that of the characters …so that such things wont happen in their own lives.Why giving examples of those stories?
    5.Women bathing nude in ancient times in public?..who told u that?..did u see them with ur own eyes?
    6.why u comparing always with women like devdasis,tribals etc? u want to become like them…why dont u completely accept their lifestyle too!
    7.Menaka is a celestial female…are they above humans?  why u considering that? Human female saints are greater than these celestial beings. u want to become like them and dance in front of demigods/devas?

  • vidyut : do what u want…wear bikini and roam around…VHP aint coming to hurt u okay 😛

  • vidyut : do what u want…wear bikini and roam around…VHP aint coming to hurt u okay 😛

  • @4eff2b82b58f41a895a68f5208fe551c:disqus

    Unless u have not understood correctly all the meanings and stories related to Gods, u should not comment on them.

    for your comment : regarding the pandavas sharing 1 wife” … u dont want to listen to the story and u want to do ku-tarka…so no one can help u…keep ur opinions to urself

    krishna teasing : he was a small child when he used to do this….dont compare God to humans

    If Lord Rama was not hero…the author should have edited the story and never shown such events of Lord Rama’s life….so later no one like u would have felt bad about it…right?

    but Valmiki or Tulsi ji didnot change it…because they knew what were his actions…

    u should make an effort to understand the actions instead of challenging them
    Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
    have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
    case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I
    just don’t think any of them will convince Read more: http://aamjanata.com/a-hindu-writes-to-vishwa-hindu-parishad/
    Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
    have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
    case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I
    just don’t think any of them will convince
    me as being good enough of a reason. Read more: http://aamjanata.com/a-hindu-writes-to-vishwa-hindu-parishad/

  • @4eff2b82b58f41a895a68f5208fe551c:disqus

    Unless u have not understood correctly all the meanings and stories related to Gods, u should not comment on them.

    for your comment : regarding the pandavas sharing 1 wife” … u dont want to listen to the story and u want to do ku-tarka…so no one can help u…keep ur opinions to urself

    krishna teasing : he was a small child when he used to do this….dont compare God to humans

    If Lord Rama was not hero…the author should have edited the story and never shown such events of Lord Rama’s life….so later no one like u would have felt bad about it…right?

    but Valmiki or Tulsi ji didnot change it…because they knew what were his actions…

    u should make an effort to understand the actions instead of challenging them
    Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
    have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
    case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I
    just don’t think any of them will convince Read more: http://aamjanata.com/a-hindu-writes-to-vishwa-hindu-parishad/
    Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
    have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
    case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I
    just don’t think any of them will convince
    me as being good enough of a reason. Read more: http://aamjanata.com/a-hindu-writes-to-vishwa-hindu-parishad/

  • Be christian and wear bikinis and roam around freely or be muslim and wear burkhas or else get beaten

    or be Hindu and wear proper clothing and stay happy

  • Be christian and wear bikinis and roam around freely or be muslim and wear burkhas or else get beaten

    or be Hindu and wear proper clothing and stay happy

  • definition of atheism needs clarity. belief in a power (entire universe, the system) is considered an atheist in Hinduism, one who does in believe in Mahadevas or Shakti as some kind of symbolic manifestations.
    other religions define atheism as absence in belief as anything as being Godly.

    some research is required for terms like re-invented, reformed and intolerance. THe religion is definitely being deformed in the names of some reforms.

    caste-ism is attributed to the religion which propogates warna-ism (a complexion), no different than the SEC classification.

  • definition of atheism needs clarity. belief in a power (entire universe, the system) is considered an atheist in Hinduism, one who does in believe in Mahadevas or Shakti as some kind of symbolic manifestations.
    other religions define atheism as absence in belief as anything as being Godly.

    some research is required for terms like re-invented, reformed and intolerance. THe religion is definitely being deformed in the names of some reforms.

    caste-ism is attributed to the religion which propogates warna-ism (a complexion), no different than the SEC classification.

  • you grew up hearing takes of Krishna’s charming exploits including stealing clothes of bathing women.

    It shows your poor knowledge on bagavatham. Krishna age was just 6. It shows your poor knowledge.

    Have you ever thought about the fact that Indian languages have no real word for adultery?

    Great, you are writing as if you have complete knowledge on Indian languages. I have no idea about saskrit. In Tamil, we have world called ‘ ilanyan’ … it represents the adultry…. Such words are also available in Telugu and malayalam…

    The ideal Brahmin woman would be bathing from top to toe in a river and entering the kitchen in a pure state.

    I wonder on what basis you have written such statements. I have never read these types of information in any of Hindu scriptures…

    Sita lived at Ravan’s place. Her integrity has always been held as
    sacred. I don’t know anyone who thinks she had an affair with Ravan, or
    otherwise did anything bad at all. Her being criticized solidly comes
    across as social bigotry.

    Do you have guts to make such contrary statement against abarahamic religious? Sita devi is avatar of Mahalakshmi. Ravan was a thuvara balk of vaikundam. Before making such rubbish statement i would suggest you to read the scripture written by Bharathians. Dont read the stories written by christian missinoray idiots…

    After all, Sita is not just a women, She is the queen. She must answer for her citizen. Ram is nothing to do with this. Because he is also answer able to people.

    • @d2284489dda30c542fe6cea84cff2c3d:disqus Shows how shallow minded you are by condemning the Authors so called ”Poor Knowledge” by blaming “Christian Idiots” , this whole article is for ppl like you

  • \you grew up hearing takes of Krishna’s charming exploits including stealing clothes of bathing women.\

    It shows your poor knowledge on bagavatham. Krishna age was just 6. It shows your poor knowledge.

    \Have you ever thought about the fact that Indian languages have no real word for adultery?\

    Great, you are writing as if you have complete knowledge on Indian languages. I have no idea about saskrit. In Tamil, we have world called ‘ ilanyan’ … it represents the adultry…. Such words are also available in Telugu and malayalam…

    \The ideal Brahmin woman would be bathing from top to toe in a river and entering the kitchen in a pure state. \

    I wonder on what basis you have written such statements. I have never read these types of information in any of Hindu scriptures…

    \Sita lived at Ravan’s place. Her integrity has always been held as
    sacred. I don’t know anyone who thinks she had an affair with Ravan, or
    otherwise did anything bad at all. Her being criticized solidly comes
    across as social bigotry.\

    Do you have guts to make such contrary statement against abarahamic religious? Sita devi is avatar of Mahalakshmi. Ravan was a thuvara balk of vaikundam. Before making such rubbish statement i would suggest you to read the scripture written by Bharathians. Dont read the stories written by christian missinoray idiots…

    After all, Sita is not just a women, She is the queen. She must answer for her citizen. Ram is nothing to do with this. Because he is also answer able to people.

    • @d2284489dda30c542fe6cea84cff2c3d:disqus Shows how shallow minded you are by condemning the Authors so called ”Poor Knowledge” by blaming “Christian Idiots” , this whole article is for ppl like you

  • I think this is just one issue out of many Hinduism have. Castism is another biggest issue which runs deep down in veins. It is controlled by few percent of the people who want to do whatever they want in the name of religion.

  • I think this is just one issue out of many Hinduism have. Castism is another biggest issue which runs deep down in veins. It is controlled by few percent of the people who want to do whatever they want in the name of religion.

  • nice work.thankyou

  • nice work.thankyou

  • excellent article..support it

  • excellent article..support it

  • Hey Vidyut..your article is cool..though lacks some good research…but overall cool.. I think hinduism which you describe is more about indianism .. where women are supposed to be covered from tip to toe..which is of course the effect of Mughal empire in India. Indians have great talent to accept the culture of wherever they are. I think thats why Indian/hindu women in big cities and abroad enjoy freedom in terms of  clothing and dating etc 

  • Hey Vidyut..your article is cool..though lacks some good research…but overall cool.. I think hinduism which you describe is more about indianism .. where women are supposed to be covered from tip to toe..which is of course the effect of Mughal empire in India. Indians have great talent to accept the culture of wherever they are. I think thats why Indian/hindu women in big cities and abroad enjoy freedom in terms of  clothing and dating etc 

  • Brilliantly written and well put. Kudos!

  • Brilliantly written and well put. Kudos!

  • Fantastic expression…

  • Fantastic expression…

  • Hinduism is not a religion (may be Dharma) but a way of life

  • Hinduism is not a religion (may be Dharma) but a way of life

  • Dear Vidyut,
    Greatly appreciate your article. I have the same feeling as yours and debate with my wife all the time about women’s rights. Shockingly, by tradition she means the imported traditions. Most of our cultural gems seem to have been destroyed. Sorry state of affairs…

  • Dear Vidyut,
    Greatly appreciate your article. I have the same feeling as yours and debate with my wife all the time about women’s rights. Shockingly, by tradition she means the imported traditions. Most of our cultural gems seem to have been destroyed. Sorry state of affairs…

  • Hey even  before i could conclude  it  went off to be posted
    I liked  the views u expressed on Hindutava not because i am a hindu but because I belive in the religion of Human ness .
    I wonder  if  one need to  take charge to  protect it as if Hinduism is in Rama temple.  Everyone who leads life LIKE A HUMAN  is a HINDU as the  phiplsophy goes and  u captured it so well.
    The way u put  points so well is  great and clearly  shows ur intellect and  suits the”thinker” part of  who u are.
    Glad  took out time to  read  this and  could reply back

  • Hey even  before i could conclude  it  went off to be posted
    I liked  the views u expressed on Hindutava not because i am a hindu but because I belive in the religion of Human ness .
    I wonder  if  one need to  take charge to  protect it as if Hinduism is in Rama temple.  Everyone who leads life LIKE A HUMAN  is a HINDU as the  phiplsophy goes and  u captured it so well.
    The way u put  points so well is  great and clearly  shows ur intellect and  suits the”thinker” part of  who u are.
    Glad  took out time to  read  this and  could reply back

  • hey vidyut, as your  name  goes,  it is  like  current  passing.article. well projected all the points.
    I read a book by Swami vivekananda on WOMEN of India . And he highlights one thing, In our country , Indian woman is a symbol of motherhood while  in western culture she is treated as  an opposite gender and  a symbol of wife. So that difference  clearly shows everywhere, U dont see sexuality when mother’s pallu falls  down but  u do when  wife’s pallu is down,  So ur article   put it right  in somany ways.
    But  one thing which  i believe and  missed on in ur article is  every right  is  accompanied with the accoutnability  too!!!!!

    while  we as women have every right and  freedom to  live the  way we want  in our own country and  home ,  we also need to  work towards the culture and  ethos of the  land to get the same respect as ma durga or kaali .Uravashis and menaka s are  not Indian  women representation but  Kaali durga,  jhansi rani or  Indira  gandhis are the indian women representation.

    Once we forget that, then obviosuly men also forget the culture and ethos of the  land. Now it is a catch 22. 

     
    If god has created any difference  in Human being,  it is just the sexual  difference. All other  differences are man created. . So  accepting the differences and  repsecting  god’s decision is  imp for both the genders rather  than becoming godlimen and  deciding  what and how the other gender has to behave!!

  • hey vidyut, as your  name  goes,  it is  like  current  passing.article. well projected all the points.
    I read a book by Swami vivekananda on WOMEN of India . And he highlights one thing, In our country , Indian woman is a symbol of motherhood while  in western culture she is treated as  an opposite gender and  a symbol of wife. So that difference  clearly shows everywhere, U dont see sexuality when mother’s pallu falls  down but  u do when  wife’s pallu is down,  So ur article   put it right  in somany ways.
    But  one thing which  i believe and  missed on in ur article is  every right  is  accompanied with the accoutnability  too!!!!!

    while  we as women have every right and  freedom to  live the  way we want  in our own country and  home ,  we also need to  work towards the culture and  ethos of the  land to get the same respect as ma durga or kaali .Uravashis and menaka s are  not Indian  women representation but  Kaali durga,  jhansi rani or  Indira  gandhis are the indian women representation.

    Once we forget that, then obviosuly men also forget the culture and ethos of the  land. Now it is a catch 22. 

     
    If god has created any difference  in Human being,  it is just the sexual  difference. All other  differences are man created. . So  accepting the differences and  repsecting  god’s decision is  imp for both the genders rather  than becoming godlimen and  deciding  what and how the other gender has to behave!!

  • If Menaka is so magnificent ,why dont we have no temple for her. Sita is the ideal woman in our culture and no where does it ask to pray and inspire from Rambas and Menakas…Her being used to seduce men is wrong and Viswamitra falling for her wronged him….

  • If Menaka is so magnificent ,why dont we have no temple for her. Sita is the ideal woman in our culture and no where does it ask to pray and inspire from Rambas and Menakas…Her being used to seduce men is wrong and Viswamitra falling for her wronged him….

  • Ripping stuff! enjoyed the read and agree with a lot of it. and quite frankly who gives a damn whether its called being Hindu or not…….this is our way of life, tolerant, inclusive plus lets have a damn good argument if we need to…! Take a bow, ma’am! got this site bookmarked now!

  • Ripping stuff! enjoyed the read and agree with a lot of it. and quite frankly who gives a damn whether its called being Hindu or not…….this is our way of life, tolerant, inclusive plus lets have a damn good argument if we need to…! Take a bow, ma’am! got this site bookmarked now!

  • Any idea re official VHP policy on ganja? I ask because I am just back from Hardwar, where fat chillums are passed around even at 6 in the morning. The official position on consumption of cannabis is highly restrictive in the large cities – again a more imported from the West

    • Hey Mohit, 

      The important thing is the priests don’t approve of beer. (God made pot. Man made beer. Whom would you trust?)

      As someone said, reality is a crutch for people who can’t cope with dope.

      Or, drugs may be the road to nowhere, but at least they’re the scenic route. Cheers to that!

      PS: Other deep thoughts for the Haridwar ghats:

      Avoid all needle drugs – the only dope worth shooting is Ramdev.

      Why is ganja against the law? It grows naturally upon our planet. Doesn’t the idea of making nature against the law seem to you a bit… unnatural?

      “I don’t do drugs. I AM drugs.” (That was Salvador Dali)

      “I’ve never had a problem with drugs. I’ve had problems with the police.” (Keith Richards… they who gather no moss)

  • Any idea re official VHP policy on ganja? I ask because I am just back from Hardwar, where fat chillums are passed around even at 6 in the morning. The official position on consumption of cannabis is highly restrictive in the large cities – again a more imported from the West

    • Hey Mohit, 

      The important thing is the priests don’t approve of beer. (God made pot. Man made beer. Whom would you trust?)

      As someone said, reality is a crutch for people who can’t cope with dope.

      Or, drugs may be the road to nowhere, but at least they’re the scenic route. Cheers to that!

      PS: Other deep thoughts for the Haridwar ghats:

      Avoid all needle drugs – the only dope worth shooting is Ramdev.

      Why is ganja against the law? It grows naturally upon our planet. Doesn’t the idea of making nature against the law seem to you a bit… unnatural?

      “I don’t do drugs. I AM drugs.” (That was Salvador Dali)

      “I’ve never had a problem with drugs. I’ve had problems with the police.” (Keith Richards… they who gather no moss)

  • Totally…  Totally.. Totally my thoughts. More ‘power’ to you Vidyut. 🙂

  • Totally…  Totally.. Totally my thoughts. More ‘power’ to you Vidyut. 🙂

  • I think you are totally confused and misguided. It is something called rebel without a cause. I couldn’t understand why have you written this blog, that too addressed to VHP. Where have you found any VHP guy stopping anyone from wearing any dress?
    You just want  a villain in your article and you have chosen VHP without understanding even bit about it.

    Someone in its comment has used words like thick-skulled and under educated about VHP.  I can only laugh on them.

  • I think you are totally confused and misguided. It is something called rebel without a cause. I couldn’t understand why have you written this blog, that too addressed to VHP. Where have you found any VHP guy stopping anyone from wearing any dress?
    You just want  a villain in your article and you have chosen VHP without understanding even bit about it.

    Someone in its comment has used words like thick-skulled and under educated about VHP.  I can only laugh on them.

  • i am  now a fan of your writing.Hats off to you, keep it up, my contribution on the way soon

  • i am  now a fan of your writing.Hats off to you, keep it up, my contribution on the way soon

  • Very Nicely articulated and I can confrm there was no “Muslim and Christian” bashing, as pointed by one of the comments.

    But I do beleive that “tolerance” has a limit and when that limit is crossed, Hindus to have rights to oppose and contradict, although I agree not in a VHP style.

    I totally agree to all other points.

  • Very Nicely articulated and I can confrm there was no “Muslim and Christian” bashing, as pointed by one of the comments.

    But I do beleive that “tolerance” has a limit and when that limit is crossed, Hindus to have rights to oppose and contradict, although I agree not in a VHP style.

    I totally agree to all other points.

  • Hats Off !!
    Amazingly written.. Message well conveyed..

  • Hats Off !!
    Amazingly written.. Message well conveyed..

  • Vividly explaine… Narrow minded people please take a note.

  • Vividly explaine… Narrow minded people please take a note.

  • Lots of interesting thoughts in this article. Though, I do wish there was less Islam and Christianity bashing. Our Christian and Muslim sisters are also victims with us Hindu women when the likes of VHP bark up the wrong tree. While this article addresses the specific issue of clothing, I despair at the God-figures we have in Hinduism. Ram is revered to be the ideal man. The man who would rather desert his wife than face society’s taunts. Arjun and his brothers are considered heroes – men who treated Draupadi as a piece of property to be shared among themselves and when the need arose even with their “vile” cousins. Krishna apparently teased women bathing – of course, this was written by a man. Did the women really find it funny? As long as we revere these figures, Indian women are doomed because we teach our men and young boys that it is okay to treat your women badly as long as you do other “good” things. Charity, as they say, in India does not begin at home. This attitude is reflected even in our “modern” culture.  If you’ve read Chetan Bhagat’s “Two States” (do not read further, if you don’t want to know how it ends.) the protagonist’s  wife-beating father is forgiven because he did something nice for his son. When we will women take a stand and stop feeding this nonsense to our sons. When do we look for heroes and heroines who treated their spouses with respect (and not just their mothers)?

    • >Though, I do wish there was less Islam and Christianity bashing. Our
      Christian and >Muslim sisters are also victims with us Hindu women when
      the likes of VHP bark up >the wrong tree

      Pointing out that certain cultural imports in present day Hindu society are gifts from Christianity or Islam doesn’t amount to bashing. It’s fair that Muslim && Christian sisters are victims too, but that their religion has more to do with their plight *in principle* than ours does.

      >I despair at the God-figures we have in Hinduism. Ram is revered to be
      the ideal man. >The man who would rather desert his wife than face
      society’s taunts.

      Your understanding of Ramayana seems to be less than biased and more than unfavorably flavored with your rogue feminist beliefs (which alas, might have a cultural applicability index, which you don’t realize).

      Maybe you should read this (provided you’re open enough to): http://prekshaa.blogspot.com/2010/03/abandoning-of-sita.html

      >Arjun and his brothers are considered heroes – men who treated Draupadi
      as a piece >of property to be shared among themselves and when the need
      arose even with their >”vile” cousins.

      YudhishiTira places not just Draupadi but his brothers (and himself) at the stake before he loses Draupadi in the dyUta. When Draupadi argues that a man who had himself become a slave could not possibly own anything (including his own wife), the elders (Dhrtarashtra included) return the ill-gotten wins from the gambling and let the Pandavas go back to Indraprastha.

      The second time around, the terms are that the losers would goto Vanavasa for 14 years.

      Now, what I don’t know is where you came up with that part about “sharing between themselves and even with their vile cousins when the need arose”. Surely, have you read the Mahabharata or have you been smoking something strong?

      Mahabharata is a story woven with complex interpersonal relationships in the triad of puruShArthAs (dharma, artha, kAma). Each character has it’s own strengths and weaknesses and symbolizes life as it is.  If you’d have cared to notice – the female characters – Kunti, Satyavati, Gandhari, Draupadi, Subhadra, Hidimbi are all strong characters in their own right, and IMO symbolic of a saner flavor of feminism.

      I don’t think any characters there – particularly Draupadi needs any sympathy of the breed of feminism you seem to advocate.

      >Krishna apparently teased women bathing – of course, this was written by a man. Did >the women really find it funny?

      Have you verified that they *didn’t* find it funny?

      Do you realize the significance of the Krishna figure in Indian spirituality or aesthetics?

      Do you know that this is the same Krishna who inspired Meera and Jayadeva?

      Seriously, how narrow-minded could you possibly get?

      >As long as we revere these figures, Indian women are doomed because we
      teach our >men and young boys that it is okay to treat your women badly
      as long as you do other >”good” things

      Explain to me how women are treated better elsewhere (historically) in comparison with India. I’ll assure you I’ll call your bluff on every example that you’ll provide me.

      Nobody disagrees about the fact that Indian women are an oppressed lot. Overcoming that has little to do with losing our culture.

      >If you’ve read Chetan Bhagat’s “Two States”

      lol Chetan Bhagat as a reference to any serious literature. Thank you, but I’d take Enid Blyton anyday.

      • Hello Foo,

        Just thought I’d take a few minutes to respond some of your statements.

        > >Though, I do wish there was less Islam and Christianity bashing. Our

        > Christian and >Muslim sisters are also victims with us Hindu women when

        > the likes of VHP bark up >the wrong tree

        The author of the blog is making the point that it is not the Hindu
        religion that is restricting women (or what they wear). It is a narrow
        and perhaps incorrect interpretation of the religion by some. Isn’t she
        doing the same with Islam (perhaps not Christianity
        directly)? Perhaps it is an interpretation of the Quran that suppresses
        certain individual rights, not the Quran itself?

        Thanks for the link. Definitely an interesting perspective – not one
        that I often consider. However, one missing possibility is: why not ask
        Sita what they should do? Does she not deserve any input or perhaps she
        is not considered smart enough or maybe just
        not capable of doing the right thing. Maybe Ram did ask her. I don’t
        know. But, the author Mr. Ramachandra does not seem to consider that as a
        possibility. I wonder why.

        I appreciate Ram’s dilemma – to support his wife or support the kingdom.
        No doubt a tough choice for a king, but does he need to treated as the the Perfect Man? Maybe the perfect king, but perfect man? I don’t think so.

        Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
        have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
        case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I
        just don’t think any of them will convince
        me as being good enough of a reason. As to all the strong women, sure! I
        am not denying there were strong women. However, I am talking about how
        a man (especially one considered the righteous king) would consider any
        person – I am especially upset about the
        wife – a commodity.

        Regarding Krishna’s teasing, no I can’t claim to have verified that the
        women did not enjoy the teasing. Are you claiming that there is proof
        that all the women enjoyed the teasing?

        Really, I have no bones to pick with Krishna. I just want to make the
        point that most often we are hearing a man’s perspective. So, are we so sure we have the whole story?

        The fact is that when we revere imperfect individuals living in
        imperfect worlds and aim to emulate them, we do great harm. Is it always
        right to do as “Ram did”?

        Regarding women of other cultures or other countries, I am not sure how
        their being treated badly justifies or explains Hindu women being
        treated badly.  Abortion of female foetuses in China does not morally
        balance out the abortion of female foetuses in India.
        I am not claiming that only Hindu (I believe I used Indian in error) are
        being treated badly. But, this blog is about the rights ofHindu women, isn’t it?

        Regards,

        Archana

        • Ah! Copy and paste messed up all the line breaks!

        • Hi Archana.

          The author of the blog is making the point that it is not the Hindu
          religion that is restricting women (or what they wear). It is a narrow
          and perhaps incorrect interpretation of the religion by some. Isn’t she
          doing the same with Islam (perhaps not Christianity
          directly)? Perhaps it is an interpretation of the Quran that suppresses
          certain individual rights, not the Quran itself?

          A: To be fair, I have nothing against Muslims. But as far as interpretations of the Quran or the Hadiths go, there aren’t too many – primarily because the Quran is a doctrine that was revealed to one man and it keeps no pretenses about how literally it should be interpreted.

          I don’t deny that there are more liberal interpretations of Islam, but these are in the minority. The *mainstream* Islamic clergy is pretty consistent on what the right interpretation of Islam is.

          I think you’re groping in the dark when you say that it’s just a matter of interpretation. Perhaps, if you read the Quran itself – your idea of what doctrines and scriptures lend themselves to interpretation – semantically, spiritually and culturally – and how would be in better clarity.

          ——
          Thanks for the link. Definitely an interesting perspective – not one
          that I often consider. However, one missing possibility is: why not ask
          Sita what they should do? Does she not deserve any input or perhaps she
          is not considered smart enough or maybe just
          not capable of doing the right thing. Maybe Ram did ask her. I don’t
          know. But, the author Mr. Ramachandra does not seem to consider that as a
          possibility. I wonder why.

          A: I agree with you that a lot of things could have been done. But as the author says – when one is in a position of power (and hence responsibility), the ideal of righteousness (in this case, the greater good) takes precedence than that of personal relationships.

          Maybe he could’ve done better. Nobody is infallible to conflicts between personal relationships and morality. There’s no fairness in that regard. Rama isn’t either.

          I’m glad that you’re open to this perspective.

          I appreciate Ram’s dilemma – to support his wife or support the kingdom.

          No doubt a tough choice for a king, but does he need to treated as the
          the Perfect Man? Maybe the perfect king, but perfect man? I don’t think
          so.

          A: I don’t think being the perfect man is all about being the perfect man for one’s woman.  I think being the perfect king contributes a bit to one’s being a perfect man. The parts add up to the sum.

          Rama’s character as a whole has it’s flaws, maybe far from perfect – but isn’t that how life is? tough choices..

          I think it is to Ramayana’s credit that Rama is portrayed just as he is, rather than as an infallible demigod.

          Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
          have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
          case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I

          A: Probably because polyandry was not unheard of in the culture that the Pandavas grew up in?

          You’d be surprised to know that there are still tribes in northern India that practise Polyandry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyandry_in_India

          Again, a reading of the Mahabharata would inform you that the Pandavas were themselves born of the members of a Deva tribe – the geography of whose existence points to present day Uttarakhand.

          As it was, in such a tribal culture (organized into sub-tribes called gaNas)  – men and women were both seen as members of a tribe rather than as people belonging to each other in a marital construct.

          Likewise, the begotten progeny too belonged to the tribe at large. If you’d know, Kunti herself had the Pandavas born of 3 different  “donors”.

          Still, what’s so offensive about 5 people marrying one person anyway? If a man is allowed to have 5 wives, why can’t a woman have 5 husbands?

          However, I am talking about how
          a man (especially one considered the righteous king) would consider any
          person – I am especially upset about the
          wife – a commodity.

          A: Draupadi says this herself – that a man who has lost his freedom no longer has rights to gamble with anything else – let alone his wife. There’s no question of a wife as a commodity.

          Are you claiming that there is proof
          that all the women enjoyed the teasing?

          A: If traditional lore is acceptable evidence (in a culture, that is) – there is ample proof that Krishna was loved for everything he did. He’s atleast inspired poets, painters, sculptors and provided more themes to Indian art and aesthetics than anybody else has.

          It’s just grossly wrong if not narrow-minded to interpret Krishna’s actions to have been denigrating of women.

          The fact is that when we revere imperfect individuals living in
          imperfect worlds and aim to emulate them, we do great harm. Is it always
          right to do as “Ram did”?

          It’s a far better thing to be aware of imperfections in the most quasi-perfect people rather than project the most perverse individuals (peace be upon them) as perfect people with revelations from above.

          Our scriptures are pretty balanced and are insightful works of literature that are quite worth reading.

          Emulation is pointless. I don’t think anybody puts their wife through an agniparIKSha because Rama did or takes 1800000 wives because Krishna did anymore.

          Regarding women of other cultures or other countries, I am not sure how
          their being treated badly justifies or explains Hindu women being
          treated badly.

          A: Hindu women must be treated better and there must be gender equality (equality in liberty, not for deconstructionist delight).

          I’m just saying that the every culture in the world has it’s own log of injustice to women and by any comparison we’re only as bad or mostly better.

          • Hello again,

             

            Thanks for the
            responses again. This time I appreciate you not questioning my sanity and commending my ability to see a different perspective.

             

            Regarding the Quran,
            the author was trying to show how open Hinduism is and then she got in a dig at
            Islam for absolutely no good reason. She needed to be called out for that. So,
            if Muslim women wanted to join the slut-walk and the Muslim “mainstream”
            zealots decided it was un-Islamic – what is our response to that? “Sorry
            ladies! Your religion actually doesn’t allow it.” What about the fact that any
            woman (or man) interested in participating is a thinking adult who has the
            constitutional right to do so? (I assume it is legal.) Why are we ignoring that
            most important fact?

             

             

            Regarding Ram, indeed
            his is not infallible. You are preaching to the choir.  And, I agree that greatness does not lie in
            only being faithful or generous to one woman. There’s more to life than that.
            Some people who are considered great may never even had a spouse! However, my
            concern is that in the case of the two very popular Hindu “Gods”,
            being good to your wife is low in the list of priorities.

             

             

            >> I think it
            is to Ramayana’s credit that Rama is portrayed just as he is, rather than as an
            infallible demigod.

             

            Good point.

             

            >> Still,
            what’s so offensive about 5 people marrying one person anyway? If a man is
            allowed to have 5 wives, why can’t a woman have 5 husbands?

             

            I am not exactly advocating
            polygamy either, am I? Polygamy or polyandry – either way I’m not really on
            board.

             

             

            >> Draupadi
            says this herself – that a man who has lost his freedom no longer has rights to
            gamble with anything else – let alone his wife. There’s no question of a wife
            as a commodity.

             

            Good for her! But,
            that didn’t stop him doing so. Nor did it stop him from earning the title righteous king, did it?

             

             

            >> If
            traditional lore is acceptable evidence (in a culture, that is) – there is
            ample proof that Krishna was loved for everything he did. He’s atleast inspired
            poets, painters, sculptors and provided more themes to Indian art and
            aesthetics than anybody else has.

             

            I’ll accept that.

             

            >> It’s just
            grossly wrong if not narrow-minded to interpret Krishna’s actions to have been
            denigrating of women.

             

            That’s your opinion
            and you are entitled to it.

             

             

            >> It’s a far
            better thing to be aware of imperfections in the most quasi-perfect people
            rather than project the most perverse individuals (peace be upon them) as
            perfect people with revelations from above.

             

            >> Our
            scriptures are pretty balanced and are insightful works of literature that are
            quite worth reading.

             

            >>Emulation is
            pointless. I don’t think anybody puts their wife through an agniparIKSha
            because Rama did or takes 1800000 wives because Krishna did anymore.

             

            There are many ways
            to emulate your Gods and heroes. You don’t need a literal fire to denigrate
            your wife (or spouse). People have found many ways around that particular challenge.

             

             

            >>A: Hindu
            women must be treated better and there must be gender equality (equality in
            liberty, not for deconstructionist delight).

             

            >>I’m just
            saying that the every culture in the world has it’s own log of injustice to
            women and by any comparison we’re only as bad or mostly better.

             

            I don’t disagree.
            But, that doesn’t mean there’s no place for change or improvement.

             

            Look, I don’t have a
            problem with Rama or the Pandavas as long as their life stories are words on a
            page. When they invade our lives and dictate how we should live our lives, I do
            have a problem.

            Regards,
            Archana

          • Interesting that you think I take a dig at Islam. I did not intend that. Not that I wouldn’t – I have no sacred cows – just that I didn’t, this time. And I read again to be sure, but I feel certain that there is no dig. However, it is true that others sometimes see more (or their own projections) in our words. I don’t know which case this is, but I’m open to the possibility that I may have done what you said. I hope you can remain open to the possibility that you see a dig where there is none.

          • Of course! It’s the printed word. Can be interpreted in many ways. If a dig/zing was not your intent, then the matter is laid to rest. 

            Did you notice how you very politely zinged me? You are good!!

        • people jst are nt informed they are interpreting as they like…there is no question of perfect man or nt…..when it comes to choosing in btw Raj dharm and wife-dharm..certainly a perfect man will choose Raj dharm……before u comment abt Krishna..please read Bhagvat Gita nd srimad bhagvat…i hope God will offer wisdom to u

          • Shri Tyagi,

            Let’s just accept that your definition and my definition of “perfect man” are not the same.

            And thanks for your prayers on my behalf.

            Regards,
            Archana

          • my defination is correct…urs has gone down selfishness

  • Lots of interesting thoughts in this article. Though, I do wish there was less Islam and Christianity bashing. Our Christian and Muslim sisters are also victims with us Hindu women when the likes of VHP bark up the wrong tree. While this article addresses the specific issue of clothing, I despair at the God-figures we have in Hinduism. Ram is revered to be the ideal man. The man who would rather desert his wife than face society’s taunts. Arjun and his brothers are considered heroes – men who treated Draupadi as a piece of property to be shared among themselves and when the need arose even with their “vile” cousins. Krishna apparently teased women bathing – of course, this was written by a man. Did the women really find it funny? As long as we revere these figures, Indian women are doomed because we teach our men and young boys that it is okay to treat your women badly as long as you do other “good” things. Charity, as they say, in India does not begin at home. This attitude is reflected even in our “modern” culture.  If you’ve read Chetan Bhagat’s “Two States” (do not read further, if you don’t want to know how it ends.) the protagonist’s  wife-beating father is forgiven because he did something nice for his son. When we will women take a stand and stop feeding this nonsense to our sons. When do we look for heroes and heroines who treated their spouses with respect (and not just their mothers)?

    • >Though, I do wish there was less Islam and Christianity bashing. Our
      Christian and >Muslim sisters are also victims with us Hindu women when
      the likes of VHP bark up >the wrong tree

      Pointing out that certain cultural imports in present day Hindu society are gifts from Christianity or Islam doesn’t amount to bashing. It’s fair that Muslim && Christian sisters are victims too, but that their religion has more to do with their plight *in principle* than ours does.

      >I despair at the God-figures we have in Hinduism. Ram is revered to be
      the ideal man. >The man who would rather desert his wife than face
      society’s taunts.

      Your understanding of Ramayana seems to be less than biased and more than unfavorably flavored with your rogue feminist beliefs (which alas, might have a cultural applicability index, which you don’t realize).

      Maybe you should read this (provided you’re open enough to): http://prekshaa.blogspot.com/2010/03/abandoning-of-sita.html

      >Arjun and his brothers are considered heroes – men who treated Draupadi
      as a piece >of property to be shared among themselves and when the need
      arose even with their >”vile” cousins.

      YudhishiTira places not just Draupadi but his brothers (and himself) at the stake before he loses Draupadi in the dyUta. When Draupadi argues that a man who had himself become a slave could not possibly own anything (including his own wife), the elders (Dhrtarashtra included) return the ill-gotten wins from the gambling and let the Pandavas go back to Indraprastha.

      The second time around, the terms are that the losers would goto Vanavasa for 14 years.

      Now, what I don’t know is where you came up with that part about “sharing between themselves and even with their vile cousins when the need arose”. Surely, have you read the Mahabharata or have you been smoking something strong?

      Mahabharata is a story woven with complex interpersonal relationships in the triad of puruShArthAs (dharma, artha, kAma). Each character has it’s own strengths and weaknesses and symbolizes life as it is.  If you’d have cared to notice – the female characters – Kunti, Satyavati, Gandhari, Draupadi, Subhadra, Hidimbi are all strong characters in their own right, and IMO symbolic of a saner flavor of feminism.

      I don’t think any characters there – particularly Draupadi needs any sympathy of the breed of feminism you seem to advocate.

      >Krishna apparently teased women bathing – of course, this was written by a man. Did >the women really find it funny?

      Have you verified that they *didn’t* find it funny?

      Do you realize the significance of the Krishna figure in Indian spirituality or aesthetics?

      Do you know that this is the same Krishna who inspired Meera and Jayadeva?

      Seriously, how narrow-minded could you possibly get?

      >As long as we revere these figures, Indian women are doomed because we
      teach our >men and young boys that it is okay to treat your women badly
      as long as you do other >”good” things

      Explain to me how women are treated better elsewhere (historically) in comparison with India. I’ll assure you I’ll call your bluff on every example that you’ll provide me.

      Nobody disagrees about the fact that Indian women are an oppressed lot. Overcoming that has little to do with losing our culture.

      >If you’ve read Chetan Bhagat’s “Two States”

      lol Chetan Bhagat as a reference to any serious literature. Thank you, but I’d take Enid Blyton anyday.

      • Hello Foo,

        Just thought I’d take a few minutes to respond some of your statements.

        > >Though, I do wish there was less Islam and Christianity bashing. Our

        > Christian and >Muslim sisters are also victims with us Hindu women when

        > the likes of VHP bark up >the wrong tree

        The author of the blog is making the point that it is not the Hindu
        religion that is restricting women (or what they wear). It is a narrow
        and perhaps incorrect interpretation of the religion by some. Isn’t she
        doing the same with Islam (perhaps not Christianity
        directly)? Perhaps it is an interpretation of the Quran that suppresses
        certain individual rights, not the Quran itself?

        Thanks for the link. Definitely an interesting perspective – not one
        that I often consider. However, one missing possibility is: why not ask
        Sita what they should do? Does she not deserve any input or perhaps she
        is not considered smart enough or maybe just
        not capable of doing the right thing. Maybe Ram did ask her. I don’t
        know. But, the author Mr. Ramachandra does not seem to consider that as a
        possibility. I wonder why.

        I appreciate Ram’s dilemma – to support his wife or support the kingdom.
        No doubt a tough choice for a king, but does he need to treated as the the Perfect Man? Maybe the perfect king, but perfect man? I don’t think so.

        Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
        have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
        case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I
        just don’t think any of them will convince
        me as being good enough of a reason. As to all the strong women, sure! I
        am not denying there were strong women. However, I am talking about how
        a man (especially one considered the righteous king) would consider any
        person – I am especially upset about the
        wife – a commodity.

        Regarding Krishna’s teasing, no I can’t claim to have verified that the
        women did not enjoy the teasing. Are you claiming that there is proof
        that all the women enjoyed the teasing?

        Really, I have no bones to pick with Krishna. I just want to make the
        point that most often we are hearing a man’s perspective. So, are we so sure we have the whole story?

        The fact is that when we revere imperfect individuals living in
        imperfect worlds and aim to emulate them, we do great harm. Is it always
        right to do as “Ram did”?

        Regarding women of other cultures or other countries, I am not sure how
        their being treated badly justifies or explains Hindu women being
        treated badly.  Abortion of female foetuses in China does not morally
        balance out the abortion of female foetuses in India.
        I am not claiming that only Hindu (I believe I used Indian in error) are
        being treated badly. But, this blog is about the rights ofHindu women, isn’t it?

        Regards,

        Archana

        • Ah! Copy and paste messed up all the line breaks!

        • Hi Archana.

          The author of the blog is making the point that it is not the Hindu
          religion that is restricting women (or what they wear). It is a narrow
          and perhaps incorrect interpretation of the religion by some. Isn’t she
          doing the same with Islam (perhaps not Christianity
          directly)? Perhaps it is an interpretation of the Quran that suppresses
          certain individual rights, not the Quran itself?

          A: To be fair, I have nothing against Muslims. But as far as interpretations of the Quran or the Hadiths go, there aren’t too many – primarily because the Quran is a doctrine that was revealed to one man and it keeps no pretenses about how literally it should be interpreted.

          I don’t deny that there are more liberal interpretations of Islam, but these are in the minority. The *mainstream* Islamic clergy is pretty consistent on what the right interpretation of Islam is.

          I think you’re groping in the dark when you say that it’s just a matter of interpretation. Perhaps, if you read the Quran itself – your idea of what doctrines and scriptures lend themselves to interpretation – semantically, spiritually and culturally – and how would be in better clarity.

          ——
          Thanks for the link. Definitely an interesting perspective – not one
          that I often consider. However, one missing possibility is: why not ask
          Sita what they should do? Does she not deserve any input or perhaps she
          is not considered smart enough or maybe just
          not capable of doing the right thing. Maybe Ram did ask her. I don’t
          know. But, the author Mr. Ramachandra does not seem to consider that as a
          possibility. I wonder why.

          A: I agree with you that a lot of things could have been done. But as the author says – when one is in a position of power (and hence responsibility), the ideal of righteousness (in this case, the greater good) takes precedence than that of personal relationships.

          Maybe he could’ve done better. Nobody is infallible to conflicts between personal relationships and morality. There’s no fairness in that regard. Rama isn’t either.

          I’m glad that you’re open to this perspective.

          I appreciate Ram’s dilemma – to support his wife or support the kingdom.

          No doubt a tough choice for a king, but does he need to treated as the
          the Perfect Man? Maybe the perfect king, but perfect man? I don’t think
          so.

          A: I don’t think being the perfect man is all about being the perfect man for one’s woman.  I think being the perfect king contributes a bit to one’s being a perfect man. The parts add up to the sum.

          Rama’s character as a whole has it’s flaws, maybe far from perfect – but isn’t that how life is? tough choices..

          I think it is to Ramayana’s credit that Rama is portrayed just as he is, rather than as an infallible demigod.

          Regarding the Pandavas, I am still baffled as to why five brothers would
          have one wife. Was it because there were too few women around as is the
          case now? I’m sure there are many good reasons in the Mahabharatha. I

          A: Probably because polyandry was not unheard of in the culture that the Pandavas grew up in?

          You’d be surprised to know that there are still tribes in northern India that practise Polyandry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyandry_in_India

          Again, a reading of the Mahabharata would inform you that the Pandavas were themselves born of the members of a Deva tribe – the geography of whose existence points to present day Uttarakhand.

          As it was, in such a tribal culture (organized into sub-tribes called gaNas)  – men and women were both seen as members of a tribe rather than as people belonging to each other in a marital construct.

          Likewise, the begotten progeny too belonged to the tribe at large. If you’d know, Kunti herself had the Pandavas born of 3 different  “donors”.

          Still, what’s so offensive about 5 people marrying one person anyway? If a man is allowed to have 5 wives, why can’t a woman have 5 husbands?

          However, I am talking about how
          a man (especially one considered the righteous king) would consider any
          person – I am especially upset about the
          wife – a commodity.

          A: Draupadi says this herself – that a man who has lost his freedom no longer has rights to gamble with anything else – let alone his wife. There’s no question of a wife as a commodity.

          Are you claiming that there is proof
          that all the women enjoyed the teasing?

          A: If traditional lore is acceptable evidence (in a culture, that is) – there is ample proof that Krishna was loved for everything he did. He’s atleast inspired poets, painters, sculptors and provided more themes to Indian art and aesthetics than anybody else has.

          It’s just grossly wrong if not narrow-minded to interpret Krishna’s actions to have been denigrating of women.

          The fact is that when we revere imperfect individuals living in
          imperfect worlds and aim to emulate them, we do great harm. Is it always
          right to do as “Ram did”?

          It’s a far better thing to be aware of imperfections in the most quasi-perfect people rather than project the most perverse individuals (peace be upon them) as perfect people with revelations from above.

          Our scriptures are pretty balanced and are insightful works of literature that are quite worth reading.

          Emulation is pointless. I don’t think anybody puts their wife through an agniparIKSha because Rama did or takes 1800000 wives because Krishna did anymore.

          Regarding women of other cultures or other countries, I am not sure how
          their being treated badly justifies or explains Hindu women being
          treated badly.

          A: Hindu women must be treated better and there must be gender equality (equality in liberty, not for deconstructionist delight).

          I’m just saying that the every culture in the world has it’s own log of injustice to women and by any comparison we’re only as bad or mostly better.

          • Hello again,

             

            Thanks for the
            responses again. This time I appreciate you not questioning my sanity and commending my ability to see a different perspective.

             

            Regarding the Quran,
            the author was trying to show how open Hinduism is and then she got in a dig at
            Islam for absolutely no good reason. She needed to be called out for that. So,
            if Muslim women wanted to join the slut-walk and the Muslim “mainstream”
            zealots decided it was un-Islamic – what is our response to that? “Sorry
            ladies! Your religion actually doesn’t allow it.” What about the fact that any
            woman (or man) interested in participating is a thinking adult who has the
            constitutional right to do so? (I assume it is legal.) Why are we ignoring that
            most important fact?

             

             

            Regarding Ram, indeed
            his is not infallible. You are preaching to the choir.  And, I agree that greatness does not lie in
            only being faithful or generous to one woman. There’s more to life than that.
            Some people who are considered great may never even had a spouse! However, my
            concern is that in the case of the two very popular Hindu “Gods”,
            being good to your wife is low in the list of priorities.

             

             

            >> I think it
            is to Ramayana’s credit that Rama is portrayed just as he is, rather than as an
            infallible demigod.

             

            Good point.

             

            >> Still,
            what’s so offensive about 5 people marrying one person anyway? If a man is
            allowed to have 5 wives, why can’t a woman have 5 husbands?

             

            I am not exactly advocating
            polygamy either, am I? Polygamy or polyandry – either way I’m not really on
            board.

             

             

            >> Draupadi
            says this herself – that a man who has lost his freedom no longer has rights to
            gamble with anything else – let alone his wife. There’s no question of a wife
            as a commodity.

             

            Good for her! But,
            that didn’t stop him doing so. Nor did it stop him from earning the title righteous king, did it?

             

             

            >> If
            traditional lore is acceptable evidence (in a culture, that is) – there is
            ample proof that Krishna was loved for everything he did. He’s atleast inspired
            poets, painters, sculptors and provided more themes to Indian art and
            aesthetics than anybody else has.

             

            I’ll accept that.

             

            >> It’s just
            grossly wrong if not narrow-minded to interpret Krishna’s actions to have been
            denigrating of women.

             

            That’s your opinion
            and you are entitled to it.

             

             

            >> It’s a far
            better thing to be aware of imperfections in the most quasi-perfect people
            rather than project the most perverse individuals (peace be upon them) as
            perfect people with revelations from above.

             

            >> Our
            scriptures are pretty balanced and are insightful works of literature that are
            quite worth reading.

             

            >>Emulation is
            pointless. I don’t think anybody puts their wife through an agniparIKSha
            because Rama did or takes 1800000 wives because Krishna did anymore.

             

            There are many ways
            to emulate your Gods and heroes. You don’t need a literal fire to denigrate
            your wife (or spouse). People have found many ways around that particular challenge.

             

             

            >>A: Hindu
            women must be treated better and there must be gender equality (equality in
            liberty, not for deconstructionist delight).

             

            >>I’m just
            saying that the every culture in the world has it’s own log of injustice to
            women and by any comparison we’re only as bad or mostly better.

             

            I don’t disagree.
            But, that doesn’t mean there’s no place for change or improvement.

             

            Look, I don’t have a
            problem with Rama or the Pandavas as long as their life stories are words on a
            page. When they invade our lives and dictate how we should live our lives, I do
            have a problem.

            Regards,
            Archana

          • Interesting that you think I take a dig at Islam. I did not intend that. Not that I wouldn’t – I have no sacred cows – just that I didn’t, this time. And I read again to be sure, but I feel certain that there is no dig. However, it is true that others sometimes see more (or their own projections) in our words. I don’t know which case this is, but I’m open to the possibility that I may have done what you said. I hope you can remain open to the possibility that you see a dig where there is none.

          • Of course! It’s the printed word. Can be interpreted in many ways. If a dig/zing was not your intent, then the matter is laid to rest. 

            Did you notice how you very politely zinged me? You are good!!

        • people jst are nt informed they are interpreting as they like…there is no question of perfect man or nt…..when it comes to choosing in btw Raj dharm and wife-dharm..certainly a perfect man will choose Raj dharm……before u comment abt Krishna..please read Bhagvat Gita nd srimad bhagvat…i hope God will offer wisdom to u

          • Shri Tyagi,

            Let’s just accept that your definition and my definition of “perfect man” are not the same.

            And thanks for your prayers on my behalf.

            Regards,
            Archana

          • my defination is correct…urs has gone down selfishness

  • *Standing ovation*

    This is so brilliantly written. Calm, collected thoughts, put forward in a logical, easy-to-read-and-understand manner. 

    I’ll say it again…brilliant!

  • *Standing ovation*

    This is so brilliantly written. Calm, collected thoughts, put forward in a logical, easy-to-read-and-understand manner. 

    I’ll say it again…brilliant!

  • Very well put! But will the people who this is intended for even understand it?? It is a sad state of affairs, to say the least, and this archaic approach will indeed spell doom for the any hope of progress, intellectual, emotional and social, for our nation.  

  • Very well put! But will the people who this is intended for even understand it?? It is a sad state of affairs, to say the least, and this archaic approach will indeed spell doom for the any hope of progress, intellectual, emotional and social, for our nation.  

  • Not well researched

  • Not well researched

  • Nice article and nicely written but in today’s frantic fast paced life, an excruciatingly long article. Coming to the point, i agree with your views and opinions and totally stand by them. The problem is not with Hindutva as an ideology but the way these poeple use it to do their moral policing. It is more about the soul of our culture and nationalism more than with any thing else (http://www.savarkar.org/content/pdfs/en/essentials_of_hindutva.v001.pdf) . Today people have forgotten what it actually stood for and that’s why people like these are able to misuse it for their own moral policing and personal/political gains. 

  • Nice article and nicely written but in today’s frantic fast paced life, an excruciatingly long article. Coming to the point, i agree with your views and opinions and totally stand by them. The problem is not with Hindutva as an ideology but the way these poeple use it to do their moral policing. It is more about the soul of our culture and nationalism more than with any thing else (http://www.savarkar.org/content/pdfs/en/essentials_of_hindutva.v001.pdf) . Today people have forgotten what it actually stood for and that’s why people like these are able to misuse it for their own moral policing and personal/political gains. 

  • Touching but not sure whether under-educated VHPs will understand even a single word.

  • Touching but not sure whether under-educated VHPs will understand even a single word.

  • Some brilliant facts, after reading this post i just have one word for people who do moral policing… perverts

  • Some brilliant facts, after reading this post i just have one word for people who do moral policing… perverts

  • I’ve become hoarse screaming the very same points out loud to everyone I know, so at this stage all I can do is bow down and say you are brilliant. Thank you.

  • I’ve become hoarse screaming the very same points out loud to everyone I know, so at this stage all I can do is bow down and say you are brilliant. Thank you.

  • Nicely written… Hope the thick skulled VHP takes note

  • Nicely written… Hope the thick skulled VHP takes note

  • brilliant!!!! bravo!!!!

    sharing it!!

  • brilliant!!!! bravo!!!!

    sharing it!!

  • This is the most beautiful piece of writing I have read in a while! If there is such a thing as intellectual love, that is what I am feeling for you right now!

    Unfortunately, I cant comment upon the main text (I fear questions will be raised as to my competance, although half my parentage entitles me to comment), but I think you have completely identified the issue when you say that religion is just being used as justification for what was already in their minds.

    Bellisimo!

  • This is the most beautiful piece of writing I have read in a while! If there is such a thing as intellectual love, that is what I am feeling for you right now!

    Unfortunately, I cant comment upon the main text (I fear questions will be raised as to my competance, although half my parentage entitles me to comment), but I think you have completely identified the issue when you say that religion is just being used as justification for what was already in their minds.

    Bellisimo!

  • Well written…! I hope it reaches them…! Almost all problems may get solved if it is put in execution…

  • Well written…! I hope it reaches them…! Almost all problems may get solved if it is put in execution…

  • thank you SISTER for showing a new face of Hinduism, appreciate your careful treading around murky face of this great religion, and why people are leaving this great religion ?

  • thank you SISTER for showing a new face of Hinduism, appreciate your careful treading around murky face of this great religion, and why people are leaving this great religion ?

  • wow………..amazing….and so so very true
    Ajit

  • wow………..amazing….and so so very true
    Ajit

  • Bravo! Vidyut,  bloody! VHP & HJS types just don’t get it, that our religion doesn’t need protection from western elements as much as from them itself. They just don’t get it that they r the biggest supporters of the purported & bigoted version of Hinduism fashioned by the invaders on us.

  • Bravo! Vidyut,  bloody! VHP & HJS types just don’t get it, that our religion doesn’t need protection from western elements as much as from them itself. They just don’t get it that they r the biggest supporters of the purported & bigoted version of Hinduism fashioned by the invaders on us.

  • Truth, Reality, fact, people cannot face them …. Gr8 writing and a brave attempt..Respect for u Vidyut 🙂

  • Truth, Reality, fact, people cannot face them …. Gr8 writing and a brave attempt..Respect for u Vidyut 🙂

  • Very well-written. Not sure I agree with all of it but yes, ‘showing skin is bad’ is a typically western thought. Maybe because of the weather there? 🙂
    I especially loved the Menaka – Vishwamitra analogy.
    Not a fan of Slutwalk but admire your thinking through the issue rather than simply reacting (as most people are wont to do)

  • Very well-written. Not sure I agree with all of it but yes, ‘showing skin is bad’ is a typically western thought. Maybe because of the weather there? 🙂
    I especially loved the Menaka – Vishwamitra analogy.
    Not a fan of Slutwalk but admire your thinking through the issue rather than simply reacting (as most people are wont to do)

  • Fantastic article……

  • Fantastic article……

  • Good job Vidyut.

  • Good job Vidyut.

  • Thank you everyone. I’ll read and reply more carefully to your comments in a day or so.

  • Thank you everyone. I’ll read and reply more carefully to your comments in a day or so.

  • Well done Vidyut! I just sent it out to all the journos i know. This is what our culture patriots and all that need to hear. I’m glad that you’ve said it, for ALL us women. xoxo

  • Well done Vidyut! I just sent it out to all the journos i know. This is what our culture patriots and all that need to hear. I’m glad that you’ve said it, for ALL us women. xoxo

  • “You can’t put ice blocks and extend the glaciers, and you can’t rescue a tolerant civilization with imported intolerance.” – Awesome!

  • “You can’t put ice blocks and extend the glaciers, and you can’t rescue a tolerant civilization with imported intolerance.” – Awesome!

  • Whenever any chks and blances are put on any religion by so caled (thekedars) of that religion,it looses its vibrancy.The hindu men will have to change themselves to their old culture if they want to have a liberal society.The mindset has to change for a better society

  • Whenever any chks and blances are put on any religion by so caled (thekedars) of that religion,it looses its vibrancy.The hindu men will have to change themselves to their old culture if they want to have a liberal society.The mindset has to change for a better society

  • Very well expressed indeed. Fanaticism anywhere is abhorrent, the more so when it rears its head in the majority religion in a secular democracy.. retrograde moral policing meets “tyranny of the majority”: the Talibanisation of Hinduism. 

  • Very well expressed indeed. Fanaticism anywhere is abhorrent, the more so when it rears its head in the majority religion in a secular democracy.. retrograde moral policing meets “tyranny of the majority”: the Talibanisation of Hinduism. 

  • respect dear vidyut i also disagree with VHP on may a issues but when u say ur fisher men ur peasants etc i disagree frm u arent they urs too….slut walk can be named differently slut is aok word may be in west but nt here i guess but point is valid men shuld respect women all d time march is for right cause i believe right full hindu will support this but to gain more strenght in rural india which still is afraid of slut..it shuld be named more like NAARI SHAKTI matr shakti etc…thats wat i think….

  • respect dear vidyut i also disagree with VHP on may a issues but when u say ur fisher men ur peasants etc i disagree frm u arent they urs too….slut walk can be named differently slut is aok word may be in west but nt here i guess but point is valid men shuld respect women all d time march is for right cause i believe right full hindu will support this but to gain more strenght in rural india which still is afraid of slut..it shuld be named more like NAARI SHAKTI matr shakti etc…thats wat i think….

  • Kyo ulze hai ye sab fizul ke libasse/ andar zankhe to dang reh jaege.

  • Kyo ulze hai ye sab fizul ke libasse/ andar zankhe to dang reh jaege.

  • Thank you for continuing to stay on top of this issue and saying what needed to be said. +1 on the whole thing. This deserves a wider readership. Maybe contact the kind of people who could publish an excerpt in the papers tomorrow morning?

  • Thank you for continuing to stay on top of this issue and saying what needed to be said. +1 on the whole thing. This deserves a wider readership. Maybe contact the kind of people who could publish an excerpt in the papers tomorrow morning?

  • I reckon Hinduism becomes an -ism only when they import
    Western-originated morality into it. Interestingly these are also the
    people who talk about national integrity, also, essentially an idea from
    the West. I am not blatantly criticising everything from the West, but I
    think there is a need to understand how any idea started out before
    protecting/defending or ridiculing them.

  • I reckon Hinduism becomes an -ism only when they import
    Western-originated morality into it. Interestingly these are also the
    people who talk about national integrity, also, essentially an idea from
    the West. I am not blatantly criticising everything from the West, but I
    think there is a need to understand how any idea started out before
    protecting/defending or ridiculing them.

  • Excellent Article, try publishing in leading newspapers, let others who have no access to internet too read.

  • Excellent Article, try publishing in leading newspapers, let others who have no access to internet too read.

  • brilliant, well said and this post was a need of time!! 

  • brilliant, well said and this post was a need of time!! 

  • Phew!!!!! That was heavy stuff…. and I appreciate the way the author has put it across. Well written, might be outrageous to sum of the so-called protectors of religion, but the fact remains – “whatever the author has written is TRUE”. And hence, I support the thought as well. Cheers!!! nn/ nn/…. VHP, please do take some lessons out of this.

  • Phew!!!!! That was heavy stuff…. and I appreciate the way the author has put it across. Well written, might be outrageous to sum of the so-called protectors of religion, but the fact remains – “whatever the author has written is TRUE”. And hence, I support the thought as well. Cheers!!! nn/ nn/…. VHP, please do take some lessons out of this.

  • Another Brilliant article. I often wonder if misogynists remember that they were born from their mother? A Woman! Although perhaps some’s misogyny itself may be well bred out of relationship with said mother. Men! Think of your Mothers! Daughters! Sisters!
    Funny how most women in most men’s lives are there to nurture and look after them. Yet so many women in so many men’s lives are subject to contempt….

  • Another Brilliant article. I often wonder if misogynists remember that they were born from their mother? A Woman! Although perhaps some’s misogyny itself may be well bred out of relationship with said mother. Men! Think of your Mothers! Daughters! Sisters!
    Funny how most women in most men’s lives are there to nurture and look after them. Yet so many women in so many men’s lives are subject to contempt….

  • FANTASTIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • FANTASTIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Brilliant! 

  • Brilliant! 

  • Clap clap clap…..v nicely told. Pyaar se thappad mara 🙂

  • Clap clap clap…..v nicely told. Pyaar se thappad mara 🙂

  • Probably I just understood my religion a little bit further after reading your letter. I hope VHP does too.. Amazing!

  • Probably I just understood my religion a little bit further after reading your letter. I hope VHP does too.. Amazing!

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